The Meteoritical Society Newsletter

December 1998

A report of the business carried out by the Society over the past year, compiled by Monica M. Grady, Secretary.

Sections: President's Editorial ** New Council ** Finances ** Publications ** Honours ** The Barringer Medal ** Annual Meetings ** Friends of Paul Pellas meet in Paris ** Saharan Martian Meteorite Available for Study, Fellows of the Meteoritical Society**

President's Editorial

Dieter Stoffler

First of all, let me remind you of the last big event of our Society: The 61st Annual Meteoritical Society Meeting in Dublin, Ireland. This meeting impressed me deeply as a very special and very successful meeting organised by a rather small group of enthusiasts around Ian Sanders. This tells us clearly that the size of the organising institution or department is not a guarantee for success, no, it's much more than that. It's the intensity of the devotion and imagination of one or maybe a few extraordinary organisers, and it is the local spirit above all. Congratulations and thanks to Ian Sanders and his crew!

I am writing this last report of my term as President of the Meteoritical Society under the impression that not only the 1998 Annual meeting was a real highlight in the long list of meetings but also the whole Society has been doing impressively well in any respect during the past year. I feel lucky and privileged finding myself in a situation where I recognise that the Society officers and the organisers of the Annual Meetings have been extremely nice to their President by breaking records (1) with respect to the setting and quality of the 1997 and 1998 meetings on the two very special and quite different islands of Hawaii and Ireland, and (2) with respect to the Society's financial condition and the quality of research produced by their members. The former is on record in our bank accounts and the latter has been demonstrated by the number and quality of publications in our prime journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science. Congratulations and thanks to the Treasurer, the Editor of MAPS, the Secretary, and to all members of the Council and of the various Committees of the Society!

The membership of the Meteoritical Society continues to stabilise on a rather high level of 800 plus including an astonishing large number of students. We all feel very happy about the increasing support for students to participate in the annual meetings through travel grants from the Society, from the Barringer Crater Company, and from individual members. Considering the present membership fee, I feel that the moderate increase by $5 (the annual fee being now $80) is justified and I am happy that the student's annual fee will be kept as low as $35. The financial situation of the Society has again improved compared to last year. The Society is indeed on save grounds and will be able in the future through its Endowment Fund to support special activities of the Society as recommended by our Investment Committee. However, there are big cost items such as the production of our journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science and we better keep the present financial safety by being conservative spenders as recommended by Joe Goldstein, the present Treasurer. The main journal of the Meteoritical Society (MAPS) is a real winner and I repeat what I said last year in this Newsletter: MAPS through the admirable guidance and devotion of the Editor, Derek Sears, continues to climb up to the level of an international top class journal in the general field of solar system and planetary science. Last year the number of published papers increased again (from 83 to 89) and the number of printed pages has exceeded for the first time the record number of 1000 pages! Most remarkable is also that the number of institutional subscriptions is now above the magic number of 200. The present situation of MAPS has given rise to the question whether the journal should go to monthly issues instead of the present bimonthly publication. This discussion will continue into the next presidentship. It is certainly not an easy matter because of the financial implications. We also gratefully recognise that some members of the Society and the Barringer Crater Company continue to donate library subscriptions of MAPS to the former Eastern bloc countries. This has been enormously helpful. The situation of Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta in relation to our Society has stabilised and remains in good condition. Just recently the Executive Committee of the Society decided to accept a proposal of the Joint Publication Committee of both the Meteoritical and the Geochemical Society to freeze the subscription rate for Meteoritical Society members at $122 for at least 1999 and 2000.

Where will the members of our Society gather again for the Annual Meetings in the next years? As most members already know we have a list of exciting meeting places from which we got firm invitations. Next year the Society will meet on a continent which has never seen a Meteoritical Society meeting so far: Africa (Johannesburg, South Africa). Another novel continent is South America, for which we have an invitation from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, although not yet confirmed and the meeting may not take place before 2004. The next millennium will start off with a meeting in Chicago organised by Chicago's Field Museum. In Dublin, Guy Consolmagno, explained in fascinating details the invitation from the Vatican Observatory for the year 2001, where we shall meet in the Pope's Audience Hall and in the Synod Aula, Vatican City State. Then back to USA and to sunny Southern California in 2002 (invitation by UCLA)! In March 1999, the Council has to decide on the 2003 meeting for which the Institute of Planetology, University of Münster, Germany, and the University of Zürich (Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule) have submitted official invitations. I hope that all members of our Society will stay in good health so that they can make it to all of these exciting meeting places.

I should like to finish this report by repeating a few thoughts about the future of the Meteoritical Society which I presented at the last meeting in Dublin, Ireland. These thoughts touched on the question: Are we, as an international and ambitious scientific society, on the right track to the next millennium? My conclusion in Dublin was that we have been indeed seeing a very healthy development of the Meteoritical Society with a steady and stable growth in all of the fundamental activities of the Society and that we are, therefore, well prepared for turning into the next century. Along with this conclusion I like to express the following seven wishes and recommendation on the basis of my very own subjective judgement: (1) Keep the present rather non-bureaucratic and effective way of running the Society! (2) Keep on getting younger people into responsible positions! (3) Improve the level of support for young scientists and students in our field. The past President has laid a solid foundation for this goal, the Society's endowment fund which is waiting for your donations! (4) Keep the strength of the very personal relationships we have in our Society. Don't change the family-type character of the Society and keep the meetings a scientists' and husband-wife-family affair! (5) Have more invited keynote speakers on our Annual meetings! (6) Keep the miracle of success of our main journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science going but don't go for a degree of expansion of the journal which could lead to instabilities in financing, editing and selling it! (7) Explore other continents for sites of the Annual Meetings. Whole continents such as Asia and South America have not been visited yet.

I cannot refrain from repeating here my thoughts on a potentially controversial issue before I leave the presidentship. It is the following question: Is the present width of activities and research within the Society's membership and the broadness and diversity of fields reflected properly and recognisably by the present name of the Society and was it logic to metamorphose the name on the Society's journal without changing the name of the Society correspondingly? I am not saying that the only logic name would be "The Meteoritical and Planetary Society" because there are lots of other and possibly better options. I realise that there are good arguments for both keeping the traditional name "Meteoritical Society" as a trade mark and for changing it in order to reflect the real activity and goals of the Society which underwent, as we all have experienced, several metamorphic events in the past decades. I feel the Society should discuss this question in the future rationally as well as emotionally.

Good luck to the Meteoritical Society!

New Council

A new Council takes office in January 1999. A Nominating Committee (Glenn MacPherson (Chair), Tammy Dickinson, Gary Huss, Christian Koeberl and Ross Taylor) was appointed to propose a slate of officers and councillors for the 1999-2000 term:

Vice-President: Gero Kurat
Treasurer: Lawrence Grossman
Secretary: Ed Scott
Councillor: A. M. Davis (US) 2nd term
W. K. Hartmann (US) 2nd term
P. Jakeš (Czech Republic) 2nd term
T. J. McCoy (US)
W. Uwe Reimold (South Africa)
L. Schultz (Germany) 2nd term
P. Warren (US) 2nd term
B. Zanda (France) 2nd term

No other candidates were put forward, and so the above will therefore comprise the new Council of Officers; brief biographical details of the new Council Members follows.

Biographical Notes

Gero Kurat is head of the Department of Mineralogy and Petrography at the Natural History Museum in Vienna. His research interests are the petrology and geochemistry of micrometeorites, meteorites and their constituents and terrestrial upper mantle rocks.
Lawrence Grossman is Chairman of the Department of the Geophysical Sciences at the University of Chicago. His main fields of interest are the mineralogical, chemical and isotopic composition of meteorites, and condensation of the Solar System.
Ed Scott is a Planetary Scientist in the Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology at the University of Hawai'i. He is an Associate Editor of Meteoritics & Planetary Science and is interested in the origin of all kinds of meteorites.
Andrew M. Davis is a Senior Research Associate in the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago. He has worked on a wide variety of cosmochemical problems through isotopic, chemical and petrologic studies of meteorites.
William K. Hartmann has studied cratering and surface evolution of planetary bodies, and effects of giant impacts on planets. He has also studied Mars and has been a Co-Investigator or participant in Mariner 9, Mars Observer, Mars Global Surveyor, and Mars-96 (Russian) missions.
Petr Jakeš is a scientist at the Institute of Geochemistry, Charles University in Prague. He is interested in impact melts, igneous petrology and instrumentation for mineralogy and petrology of planetary surfaces.
Timothy McCoy is Assoc. Curator of Meteorites at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington. His research primarily focuses on using petrology and experimental petrology to understand the early differentiation of asteroids.
Wolf Uwe Reimold is Senior Lecturer of Mineralogy in the Department of Geology at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. His main research interests are mineralogical, geochemical, and structural geological aspects of impact structures, as well as economic geological implications of impact cratering. In recent years he has focused mainly on the Vredefort-Witwatersrand structure and other African impact structures.
Ludolf Schultz is with the Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry in Mainz (Germany). His main research interest are noble gases in extraterrestrial materials.
Paul Warren is a Research Geochemist at UCLA, and has recently been Visiting Professor at Tokyo University. His primary research interests are Moon rocks, achondrites, and the early igneous evolution of planets.
Brigitte Zanda is Maitre de Conferences in the Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle (Paris). She did her thesis on galactic cosmic ray irradiation of meteorites, and is now studying the mineralogy of chondrules.

Finances

Joseph I. Goldstein Treasurer

The balance sheet for 1997, given below, shows the Society to be in a healthy financial position. The royalties from Pergamon (Elsevier) Press for the publication of Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta continue to accrue. We have a total of $122,820 through the end of 1997, an increase of $23,738 from the first of the year. These funds constitute the majority of the Society's Endowment Fund.

BALANCE SHEET
December 31, 1997

Bank balance 12/31/97	$50,793
Money Market Account	$32,525
Total 12/31/97	$83,318

Bank balance 1/1/97	$72,205
  (excl. Pergamon, Elsevier)

Net gain, Jan. - Dec. 1997	$11,113

Net Capital as of 12/31/97	$83,318
As of June 30, 1998 our Net Capital is $101,464, our total royalties from Pergamon (Elsevier) is $160,677, and the endowment for the Nier Prize is valued at $66,306.

We have accepted payment for 1998 society dues by Visa or Master Charge for the first time. This arrangement has been viewed very positively by the membership.

The current number of members paid for 1998 is 861, essentially the same number of members we have had for the last few years. This number includes 96 student members, and 38 retired members. Of this total, 534 members are from the US. The next five highest member countries are Germany (98), Japan (91), France (42), United Kingdom (41), and Switzerland (29).

We are very thankful to the following members who have made a substantial impact on society finances in the form of gifts. The following members gave major gifts of $100 or more this past year: Evans H. Burn, William Greenberg, Gerald C. Herfurth, Roderick W. Leonard, Calvin Leroy Shipbaugh and John Wasson.

The following members also gave donations: Stefano Accomazzi, Edward Anders, David J. Barber, Milton Blander, Alfredo Brogioni, Peter Buseck, Roy S. Clark Jr., Lon Clay, Jr, Ghislaine Crozaz, Vincenzo DeMichelle, Noel Eberz, Takaaki Fukuoka, Billy P. Glass, David P. Gold, Joseph I. Goldstein, Guy Heinen, Robert Hutchison, Yukio Ikeda, Eugene Jarosewich, Anthony John Jeffries, Anthony J. T. Jull, Truman P. Kohman, Guenter W. Lugmair, Charles A. Lundquist, J. Douglas MacDougall, Akimasa Masuda, Harry Y. McSween, Daniel J. Milton, John W. Morgan, Barbara L. Narenda, Robert O. Pepin, Robert C. Reedy, Oliver H. Rosham, Gerald L. Rowland, Lawrence A. Taylor, John Ter Haar, Ann M. Welbon, William W. Welbon and George Wetherill.

Special gifts were also given: Michael E. Lipschutz in memory of Paul Pellas, Ursula B. Marvin in memory of Robert S. Dietz, Eugene M. Shoemaker, Paul Pellas and J. Paul Barringer, and William A. Cassidy in memory of Robert S. Dietz, Paul Pellas, and J. Paul Barringer. The following members gave donations to the endowment fund: Charles E. S. Arps, Henry Price Deyerle, Jr, and Bevan M. French.

Next year's (1999) dues statement will be sent before the end of the year. The treasurer would appreciate your prompt response; late dues payment often result in temporary suspension of your subscription to Meteoritics and Planetary Science and in some cases, GCA. If you have any questions about your dues or membership status, the easiest and fastest way to reach the treasurer is by email, (JIG0@ecs.umass.edu). As of January 1, 1999, Larry Grossman, University of Chicago, will be the new treasurer. It has been a pleasure serving the society for the past four years.

Publications

Publications Committee Frank Podosek (Chair)

Karl K. Turekian, Executive Editor of Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, will retire from the editorship at the completion of his current term, which runs through the end of calendar year 1999. We would like to express our great appreciation for Karl's effort and leadership in this critical position. Nominations for Karl's successor as Executive Editor, for a term beginning in 2000, are now in order. A formal announcement of Karl's retirement, and a call for nominations, will be published in GCA, but there is no need to wait until publication before submitting nominations. Any member of the Society may submit a nomination. Nominations should be submitted to Frank A. Podosek, chair of the Joint Publications Committee, preferably by e-mail (fap@levee.wustl.edu).

The individual (member) subscription rate for GCA in 1999 will be $122, the same as this year. The page count for GCA has been reduced somewhat in comparison to that of the past few years, resulting in cost reductions that can be used to keep the individual subscription rate stable for a while.

Meteoritics & Planetary Sciences Derek Sears (Editor)

The journal thrives. The associate editor pool grows, ideas for growth and improvement fire across the internet, and an office staff works overtime. The quality and quantity of work appearing in the journal now rivals the best journals in the field and the Institute for Scientific Information gives Meteoritics and Planetary Science the highest impact rating of any journal in the geo- or planetary sciences. The final compliment, competing journals that were once thought to be the best journals in our field are emulating Meteoritics and Planetary Science by soliciting Invited Reviews and putting pictures on the cover. When I assumed the editorship in the summer of 1991, officially taking the reins in January 1992, I had a number of objectives. Most of them I kept secret for fear of being considered overly ambitious or unrealistic. Some I shared with trusted colleagues, colleagues who turned out to be indispensable friends and supporters and who deserve but never receive the credit for the growth in the journal. People like Frank Podosek, Mike Lipschutz, Richard Grieve, Ross Taylor, Heinrich Wänke, Ed Anders, Dieter Stoffler, Denis Shaw, Bill Hartmann, Don Brownlee, Ursula Marvin, Al Cameron, Ludolf Schultz, Mike Drake, Hap McSween, Ed Scott, Paul Warren and Hazel Sears. Some came to my aid when I most needed it, while others offer that rare type of quiet, reliable, almost daily, support. Support that came in many forms, like helping with difficult decisions, coming up with new ideas, encouraging me to take risks when necessary, or handling a $30,000 deficit on the journal's budget without recrimination and complaint. These colleagues share the vision of a successful journal serving the needs of a unique community and making a real difference to the quality, rigor and vigour of our research field.

Like the Science it serves, the journal has moved from an esoteric specialised interest to an integral part of main stream planetary science. Meteoritics, the Science, came of age in the nineteen-nineties. I am proud to have many friends and colleagues on the editorial board who are not primarily meteorite specialists, people like Rick Binzel, Pat Cassen, Paolo Farinella, Bill Hartmann, and Carle Pieters. These people are the key to the future success of the journal and all are engaged active participants in the journal's operation. And of course there is considerable support from other meteorite specialists, Alex Deutsch, Jerry Delaney, Joe Goldstein, Urs Krahenbuhl, Dave Mittlefehldt, Hiroko Nagahara, George Wetherill, Rainer Wieler and Ernst Zinner.

So what next? In the near future, I would like to see an end to the "abstract fees", an unnecessary thorn in the flesh of our brave volunteer meeting organisers that reflects badly on the journal. Gone are the days when our journal has such minor status that it needs to scratch around to raise a few thousand dollars off the backs of volunteers. More significantly, Meteoritics and Planetary Science must go to monthly publication. Doubling the frequency of publication means that the journal can perform its function twice as well. Doubling the frequency of publication would bring it into line with all of our major competitors. The case hardly needs making that Meteoritics and Planetary Science should go monthly when every major first-rank specialised journal is published monthly, GCA twice a month. The amount of material being submitted warrants monthly publication and most members would prefer two regular sized issues to the telephone directory that arrived on their desks in August. Council must find the resources to cover the extra costs without hiking dues. This should not be difficult. The annual cost of GCA to our libraries is $1300, for Icarus it is $1830 and for EPSL it is $2477. Meteoritics and Planetary Science, with the highest Science Impact Rating, better circulation than some of these competitors, and publishing comparable or better work, costs the libraries $365. Even though we are a scholarly society, without any wish to be profit making, we are grossly under-pricing the journal. This year I had intended to propose to Council that we take Meteoritics and Planetary Science to monthly publication, but circumstances intervened and I did not do so. Now I plan to make the proposal to Council at its meeting next March and in next year's newsletter I plan to discuss the progress.

Honours

The Leonard Medal Otto Eugster (Chair)

The Leonard medal of 1998 was awarded to Stuart Ross Taylor. Excerpts from the nominations read:

Ross' career spans almost 40 years. In additions to outstanding contributions in the Earth Sciences, he has made seminal contributions to planetary science.
A series of papers dating from 1959 not only characterised tektites, but demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt that they were of terrestrial origin.
Ross was among the first to propose the "chondritic Earth" model in 1964. Later, with a series of colleagues he determined the composition of the continental crust of the Earth. Ross was instrumental in analysing the returned lunar samples. He played a crucial role in obtaining high quality trace element analyses...he was the only scientist to obtain reliable analyses of the element Mo in lunar samples.

The 1999 Leonard Medal will be awarded to Professor Grenville Turner

Members of the Leonard Medal Committee in 1997, when this selection was made, were: Otto Eugster (Chair), Elmar Jessberger, Jim Papike, John Wasson and John Wood. Nominations for Leonard medallists are encouraged and may be submitted to Jim Papike (Leonard Medal Committee Chair in 1999), prior to January 15th 1999. His address is: Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science, Univ. New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA: Fax: 1 505 277 3577). Nominations may also be submitted to Ed Scott (Meteoritical Society Secretary from Jan. 1st., 1999; Fax: 1 808 956 6322).

Fellows

Ten members of the Society were elected Fellows in 1998: Addi Bischoff, John Bradley, Adrian Brearley, Gerlind Dreibus-Kapp, Mitsuru Ebihara, Gary Huss, Tim Jull, Typhoon Lee, K. Tomeoka and Michael Zolensky.

A list of Fellows (past and present) is printed at the end of the Newsletter. The next election of Fellows will be in 2000; nominations for Fellows are encouraged and may be submitted to Jim Papike (Leonard Medal Committee Chair in 1999), prior to January 15th 1999. His address is: Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science, Univ. New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA: Fax: 1 505 277 3577). Nominations may also be submitted to Ed Scott (Meteoritical Society Secretary from Jan. 1st., 1999; Fax: 1 808 956 6322).

The Nier Prize

The initiation of the Nier Prize for young scientists was announced in the May 1995 issue of Meteoritics. The award honours the memory of Alfred O. C. Nier, and is supported by an endowment given by Mrs Ardis H. Nier. The prize-winner is proposed by the Leonard Medal Committee, and must be under 35 years old.

The Nier Prize of 1998 went to Gopalan Srinivasan. Excerpts from the nominations read:

Dr Srinivasan has done an outstanding piece of PhD. work that conclusively established the presence of the short-lived nuclide 41Ca in the early Solar System. He followed it up with the observation of 26Al in CAIs and chondrules of ordinary chondrites (in collaboration with colleagues from Caltech and Smithsonian).
The work....has been widely acknowledged both by planetary scientists and astrophysicists. This observation has put the most stringent constraints of < 1 Ma for the time scale for the formation of the Sun and some of the first solar system objects.

The Nier Prize for 1999 will be awarded to B. G. Choi.

Nominations for Nier prize-winners are encouraged and may be submitted to Jim Papike (Leonard Medal Committee Chair in 1999), prior to January 15th 1999. His address is: Dept. of Earth & Planetary Science, Univ. New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 USA: Fax: 1 505 277 3577). Nominations may also be submitted to Ed Scott (Meteoritical Society Secretary from Jan. 1st., 1999; Fax: 1 808 956 6322).

The Barringer Medal Billy Glass (Chair)

The Barringer Medal of 1998 went to Boris A. Ivanov. Excerpts from the nominations read:

Boris Ivanov has more than 20 years experience in studying planetary cratering. His main goal is to establish connections between field observations of terrestrial impact structures, remote sensing data from the surfaces of other planetary bodies, and numerical cratering models. One of his main contributions has been in understanding the formation of central uplifts in complex craters.
He has been a leader in the characterisation of impact craters on Venus and the effect of the dense venusian atmosphere on the cratering process.
Ivanov's recent research on the Chicxulub impact has produced a solid scenario of how shock would affect the local target rocks, leading to atmospheric and climactic changes.
Boris Ivanov has contributed significantly to our understanding of the physics of impact cratering.

The 1999 Barringer Medal will be awarded to H. J. Melosh

Members of the Barringer Medal Committee in 1997, when this selection was made, were: Billy Glass (Chair), Alex Deutsch, Bevan French, and Richard Grieve.

The Barringer Medal is awarded annually by the Society to recognise and encourage original research on the phenomena of meteorite impact and the study of meteorite impact craters. The following summary description of the award and the nomination procedures was prepared last year by the Barringer Medal Committee from information in the by-laws and various issues of Meteoritics. The Committee hopes that this information will facilitate nominations for this award by providing Society members with the detailed information needed to nominate colleagues. Nominations for the award to be presented in 2000, must be received in the specified format by January 15, 1999 by either the Committee Chair or the Secretary of the Society.

The Barringer Medal

Purpose and selection procedures

The Barringer Medal and Award Programme (hereafter called "the Medal"), sponsored by the Barringer Crater Company, was established in 1982 to honour the memory of Daniel Moreau Barringer, Sr. and his son Daniel Moreau Barringer, Jr., who carried out intensive studies that helped establish, against considerable scientific opposition, the impact origin of the Barringer (Meteor) Crater, Arizona and also identified the Odessa Crater, Texas as the second proven terrestrial impact crater. The purpose of the Medal is to "encourage original research in impact crater phenomena," and "the Barringer Medal recognises outstanding work in the field of impact cratering, and/or work that has led to a better understanding of impact phenomena." The Medal is presented annually by the Society. Past awards have recognised a wide range of research activities: theoretical modelling of impact processes; laboratory crater-formation experiments; experimental studies of the physical nature of shock waves and their effects on rocks and minerals; the identification of terrestrial impact structures and the effects of their formation on the geological and biological history of the Earth; the effects of impact-produced shock waves on natural target rocks and minerals; the nature and genesis of impact-produced breccias, impact melts, glasses, tektites and other rock types; and geological, geochemical and geophysical studies of terrestrial and planetary impact craters. Previous winners have been: E. M. Shoemaker, R. S. Dietz, D. E. Gault, W. von Engelhardt, M. R. Dence, V. E. Barnes, R. A. F. Grieve, V. Masaitis, E. C. T. Chao. D. Stöffler, D. W. Roddy, W. A. Cassidy, F. Hörz, T. J. Ahrens and B. A. Ivanov. (The 1999 medal will be awarded to H. J. Melosh).

Eligibility: Any living scientist is eligible for the Medal, including both Members and Non-members of the Society. Members of the Barringer Medal Committee (see below) are not eligible to be nominated. Nominations: Members of the Society are urged to make nominations, since the presentation of the Medal is an important Society function that requires the active participation of the membership. Nominations may be made by any member of the Society in good standing. A member may not make more than one nomination in a one year period of time. Nominations must be made in writing and submitted in the appropriate format (see below) to the Chair of the Medal Committee on or before January 15 of the year before the Medal is to be presented. Members of the Barringer Medal Committee may not make or second nominations during their period of service on the Committee.

Format: The nomination should include: (a) a biographical sketch of the candidate; (b) a summary and evaluation of the accomplishments of the candidate and the importance of his/her work; and (c) a list of publications covering the work to be considered for the award. The Nominator should also provide, or arrange to have provided, to the Chair, seconding letters which support the nomination and which may provide additional information. Seconding letters may be provided either by Members of the Society or by appropriate knowledgeable outside scientists.

Evaluation: Evaluation of the nominations will be carried out by the Barringer Medal Committee (hereafter known as "the Committee"). This Committee shall consist of four Society members appointed by the President, one of whom shall be nominated by the Barringer Crater Company. The Committee members shall serve staggered four-year terms. Committee members may not be appointed for a second consecutive term. The Chair is appointed by the President for a one-year term. The Committee shall decide on the means of selecting a candidate for the Medal from the nominations and shall present its candidate for the Medal, along with supporting documentation, to the Council at the Annual Meeting. Concurrence in the selection by the Council shall be by two-thirds of all voting members present. Duration of Nominations: Nominations will be kept active, and will be reconsidered annually by the Committee, for four years after submission. During this period, the original Nominator may provide to the Chair supplementary material reflecting new developments (e.g., new research results or publications), which will be considered with the original nomination. After this four-year period, a completely new Nomination will be required, and the original Nominator will be so informed by the Chair of the Committee.

Nominations for Barringer medallists are encouraged and may be submitted to Richard Grieve (Barringer Medal Committee Chair in 1999), prior to January 15th 1999. His address is: Geological Survey of Canada, 1 Observatory Crescent, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y3 Canada. Fax: 1 613 952 8987. Nominations may also be submitted to Ed Scott (Meteoritical Society Secretary from Jan. 1st., 1999; Fax: 1 808 956 6322).

Annual Meetings

1998; Dublin Ian Sanders

The 61st Annual Meeting of the Society was held in Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland from 27 - 31 July 1998. The meeting attracted 413 registrants - 238 members, 27 non-members, 38 student members, 20 student non-members and 90 guests. A majority of these stayed in university rooms - and some even admitted to being happy there. From the welcome reception with the Lord Mayor of Dublin through to the farewell party in the Geology Department's Venetian-style building, the meeting seemed to flow without serious problem.

There were 309 published abstracts, of which 82 were presented as posters and 212 presented orally. The very busy schedule was made workable by 8.30 am starts (very early by Irish standards!) and a lack of coffee breaks (coffee and biscuits were supplied continuously!). A full program of evening entertainments effectively forced people to mix and mingle, particularly on the evening of Irish dancing. On a showery Wednesday afternoon a choice of social activities split the group into happily dispersed sub-sets - some very dispersed and not-so-happy. (I still have a guilty conscience over abandoning Roy Lewis on the far side of a dense growth of rhododendrons on the Hill of Howth.) The banquet took place in the elegant surroundings of the Great Hall of the Royal Hospital, Kilmainham. 34 people stayed on after the meeting to attend field trips near Ireland's Atlantic coast

A very generous donation from the Barringer Crater Company helped 24 students to travel to the meeting. The meeting would not have been possible without the tireless and highly professional services of the Lunar and Planetary Institute who prepared the announcements, the program booklets, and the abstract volume.

1999, Johannesburg W. Uwe Reimold

The 62nd Annual Meeting will be held in Johannesburg, South Africa from 1999 July 11-16.

Preparations for the 1999 Annual Meeting of the Society in Johannesburg have gone into full swing. The First Announcement has been circulated and additional information is available on the meeting website and from the organisers via the meeting e-mail 065msoc@cosmos.wits.ac.za. Judging from the opinion poll obtained at this year's meeting in Dublin, the overwhelming feeling was one of enthusiasm for the first- ever meeting of the Society in Africa - a unique opportunity to experience the fascinating impact and geological features of southern Africa. At Dublin, a few members expressed concern about personal safety in Johannesburg, an issue which was addressed by Uwe Reimold during the Business Meeting in Dublin. He stated emphatically that the Organising Committee will provide all possible measures to ensure participants' safety. He pointed out that the risk of pickpocketing etc. was no different in Johannesburg than in any other metropolitan area in the world. In contrast to other previous venues, the layout of Johannesburg requires a somewhat different program and activities, emphasising group activities and travel rather than individual strolling along streets. Transport to and from hotels, the meeting venue on the campus of the University of the Witwatersrand, and to all social functions will be provided. If participants provide their arrival details timeously, they will be collected from the airport. Those who wish to explore wider parts of South Africa, will find that this country has all the necessary infrastructure to explore it on your own (for example, by rental car). Regarding these opportunities and any other concerns and general enquiries, contact Uwe Reimold at the above given e-mail address. The conference will feature a number of special symposia: The Working Group on Cosmic Mineralogy of the International Mineralogical Association is sponsoring a special session on "Mineralogy of Impact- Related Phenomena". The Working Group on Extraterrestrial Geochemistry of the International Association of Geochemistry and Cosmochemistry will co-sponsor a special session on "The Thermal History of Meteorites". And the organisers of MetSoc '99 hope to find support for a special session of review talks on "State-of-the-Art Analytical Techniques". Ludolf Schultz (E-mail: schultz@mpch-mainz.mpg.de) and several colleagues are preparing a two day Symposium on "Extraterrestrial Materials from Hot and Cold Deserts", which will be held on 7 and 8 July 1999 in the beautiful Kwa-Maritane Resort in the Pilanesberg Game Reserve, about 2 hours driving from Johannesburg. A wide range of field excursions will take place (Vredefort, Bushveldt Complex, Barberton Mountain Land, Namibia, and - possibly - Zimbabwe). Please ensure that your Indication of Interest form is returned to the Lunar and Planetary Institute before 15 November 1999, to ensure that you will receive the Second Announcement with all necessary details on this conference.

Future Meetings

Invitations have been accepted from the following:

2000 Chicago (University and Field Museum)
2001 Vatican Observatory, Rome
2002 Universities of Southern California

Friends of Paul Pellas meet in Paris

The Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle in Paris held a symposium in honour of the late Paul Pellas on July 23-24, 1998. It was organised by Claude Perron and Brigitte Zanda, with help from other colleagues in the Labo. de Minéralogie and Grande Galerie de l'Evolution, and in the Meteoritical Society and the Soc. Min. Crist. de France. Roughly one hundred scientists from a dozen countries attended. Seventeen invited talks covered a very wide range of topics in meteoritics and cosmochemistry, and the ample time allowed for discussion permitted debates of the type Paul Pellas loved. The abstract volume, illustrated with photographs of Paul and reproductions of some of his familiar overheads, is still available from the organisers (perron@mnhn.fr, zandahew@rci.rutgers.edu). A more permanent memorial to Paul Pellas is planned. Information will be sent by an ad hoc Paul Pellas committee to those who attended the meeting, or requested the abstract volume. Other interested parties should contact G. J. Wasserburg, isotopes@gps.caltech.edu.

Family, friends and colleagues of Paul joined the meteoriticists for two evening functions, the first a banquet. Any banquet in honour of Paul clearly had to feature wines of such a quality that he would have put on a tie to drink them. But where in France could you find enough bottles of the appropriate vintages? It was a novel and hectic experience for the organisers to look up famous châteaux in the phone book to ask them which dealers to try. Finally, the guests were regaled with a medal-winning Pouilly Fumé Domaine Guyot 1997, a Corton Domaine Latour 1988, a Châteaux Ducru-BeauCaillou 1981, and a Châteaux Climens 1986. The Corton, served with poitrine de veau en roulade aux morilles, tasted very good, especially considering it spent several days going around Paris on a truck right up to several hours before it was served.

The symposium concluded with a commemorative evening, which opened with a movie made by Dominique Jerôme. This was made at the Tours 1975 Meteoritical Society meeting, which was organised in large part by Paul, and featured many hilarious scenes of very familiar but twenty-three-year younger Meteoritical Society members.

Paul's acting career was legendary, but surprisingly the legends are far outstripped by the reality. He played on stage every night for numerous years during the fifties and early sixties, in "The Importance of Being Earnest", "Les Poissons d'Or", "Entre Chien et Loup", La Dévotion et la Croix", "Coriolanus", "Caesar and Cleopatra", "Les Troyennes", "The Caine Mutiny" and "Le Bossu". Of the latter, he liked to stress that, though he had to play down his fencing skills in his role as the Duke of Nevers, still his rapid but polished death assured the coherence and success of the whole play. Paul's stage successes were commemorated only by photographs.

Paul was very modest about his career in film, so much so that there were widespread rumors that he had only a single line of dialogue. A video montage put together by his son Marc Pellas, "Quelques scènes de la vie de Paul Pellas" showed, however, that he played major roles in many films. Excerpts showed him as a film producer in "La Vie Privée", with Brigitte Bardot, a detective in "Roger la Honte", a board member in "L'Aîné des Ferchaux", a night club waiter in "Le Désordre et la Nuit" and a prisoner in a German camp in "Les Evadés". Unfortunately "Touchez pas aux Blondes", in which Paul played the lead role of a California crime boss, was not available. The story is that his spectacular end in this film, clinging to a barstool, made a tremendous impression on the cinema world of the early sixties.

A TV newsreel clip taken during the student demonstrations on the Boulevard St. Michel on May 8th 1968 followed the movie excerpts. In this, Paul challenges the Prefect of Police, who is on the scene with his forces, and urges police open-mindedness to "our children". Four videos showed Paul the scientist explaining meteorites, presolar grains and the KT event, complete with emphatic gestures. The "Scènes" concluded with two amusing and touching videos showing Paul reading stories to his little grand-daughter.

Though almost everyone who attended might have wanted to share their stories about notre petit Paulo, there was time for only a few. Bob Walker recalled introducing fission tracks to a very sceptical Pellas in the winter of 1962, in a very chilly Paris museum lab. The etching technique used to display tracks was explained and then tried out on several mica specimens. Despite all assurances that this always worked in the USA, it failed totally in Paris, making Paul increasingly impatient. Finally, Bob realised that it was just too cold in the lab for the acid to react in the usual time, so he increased the etching time, and the rest is history. A delighted Pellas invited him home for lunch, and Walker maintains, with a straight face, that as this was the first time he ever visited a French home he concluded that all French people always have champagne with lunch.

Ludolf Schultz showed slides from their meteorite-collecting (and wine-freezing) trip in the Antarctic, explaining that Antarctic conditions for cooking and personal hygiene were not quite up to Paul's standards. Paul volunteered to go back to McMurdo with Ludolf and an injured team-mate because, he wrote to Ghislaine Crozaz, "after five weeks, ... I dreamed of taking a nice shower." He had, however, succeeded in taking drinkable wine into the field, by uncorking bottles and removing wine, so that freezing would not break the bottles. He wrote to Ghislaine: "The white wine which had been "defrozen" was surprisingly drinkable... Of course, I would not have frozen and thawed a good Bordeaux or Burgundy but, well, California Chablis and New Zealand Riesling can be subjected to some of the rigors of the Antarctic." Ghislaine recalled many happy moments over the years, but also the sad ones when Paul learned of the final return of his illness.

John Wood showed slides emphasising recent happy times, especially the vacations shared by Paul and Martine with John and Julie Wood. John also repeated his Maui 1997 announcement of the orbit of asteroid 7386 Paulpellas, shown in the figure. Let's hope it turns out to be an ordinary chondrite or acapulcoite body. The wine glass symbol is very appropriate, especially because it also means fragile (do not disrupt). The meeting finale was the presentation by Jean-Pierre Bibring to Marc Pellas of a detailed sky map showing the position of Paulpellas among the stars for that day, July 24th, which was also the anniversary of Paul's birth.

Roger H. Hewins

Saharan Martian Meteorite available for study

The find in the Sahara Desert by a private collector of a 13th martian meteorite was reported at the 61st Annual Meeting in Dublin by Dr Jutta Zipfel, of the MPI in Mainz.

Dr Zipfel has been successful in securing 15g of material for free distribution within the scientific community for research. The material comprises one slice and 3 thin sections.

Proposals for material, not longer than 1 page, should be submitted to:

Dr. Jutta Zipfel
Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry
Becherweg 27
55128 Mainz, Germany
fax: 49-6131-371 290
email: zipfel@mpch-mainz.mpg.de

The proposal dead-line will be 15th January 1999. We will decide within a short time and assign and send out material by the end of January at the latest.

Fellows of the Meteoritical Society (Past & Present)

L. Ahrens
C. Allegre
E. ANDERS
J. O. ANNEXSTED
J. R. ARNOLD
G. ARRHENIUS
H. AXON
R. BALDWIN
V. E. BARNES
B. BARRINGER
C. BAUER
R. H. BECKER
F. BEGEMANN
R. A. BINNS
A. BISCHOFF
M. BLANDER
D. D. BOGARD
W. V. BOYNTON
J. P. BRADLEY
A. J. BREARLEY
R. BRETT
D. BROWNLEE
R. P. BRYSON
V. F. BUCHWALD
P. R. BUDKA
D. S. BURNETT
P. BUSECK
C. P. BUTLER
A. G. W. CAMERON
W. A. CASSIDY
V. CHAMBERLIN
S. CHANG
C. R. CHAPMAN
R. S. CLARKE JR
D. D. CLAYTON
R. N. CLAYTON
W. H. CLEVERLY
A. J. COHEN
A. F. COOK
G. CROZAZ
W. D. CROZIER
A. M. DAVIS
R. DAVIS JR.
M. R. DENCE
R. S. DIETZ
R. T. DODD
M. J. DRAKE
G. DREIBUS-KAPP
M. B. DUKE
R. W. DUNDON
P. EBERHARDT
M. EBIHARA
W. D. EHMANN
A. EL GORSEY
D. P. ELSTON
W. E. ELSTON
W. v. ENGELHARDT
S. EPSTEIN
O. EUGSTER
W. A. FEIBELMAN
E. L. FIREMAN
D. E. FISHER
I. S. FISHER
K. FREDRIKSSON
B. M. FRENCH
P. E. FRICKER
R. F. FUDALI
M. J. GAFFEY
D. E. GAULT
J. GEISS
E. K. GIBSON JR
B. P. GLASS
P. S. GOEL
J. I. GOLDSTEIN
A. GRAHAM
R. A. F. GRIEVE
J. N. GROSSMAN
L. GROSSMAN
I. HALLIDAY
C. T. HARDY
W. K. HARTMANN
L. A. HASKIN
J. W. HEAD
P. W. HEALY
C. L. HEMENWAY
E. P. HENDERSON
G. HERZOG
R. H. HEWINS
H. HINTENBERGER
P. W. HODGE
J. V. HODGES
D. HOFFLEIT
C. M. HOHENBERG
M. E. HONDA
F. HORZ
L. E. HUMISTON
G. R. HUSS
G. I. HUSS
I. D. HUTCHEON
R. HUTCHISON
O. B. JAMES
E. JAROSEWICH
E. K. JESSBERGER
R. H. JONES
A. J. T. JULL
G. W. KALLEMEYN
K. KEIL
J. F. KERRIDGE
S. W. KIEFFER
E. A. KING JR.
T. KIRSTEN
R. KNOX JR.
C. KOEBERL
T. P. KOHMAN
F. KRAUT
E. L. KRINOV
G. KURAT
D. LAL
D. L. LAMAR
W. B. LANCE
H. E. LANDSBERG
J. LAPAZ
L. LAPAZ
J. W. LARIMER
T. LEE
G. R. LEVI-DONATI
C.-M. LEVY
R. S. LEWIS
B. A. LINDBLAD
M. E. LIPSCHUTZ
G. LOFGREN
J. F. LOVERING
G. W. LUGMAIR
C. A. LUNDQUIST
J. D. MACDOUGALL
G. J. MACPHERSON
R. A. MARINGER
K. MARTI
U. B. MARVIN
B. MASON
A. MASUDA
M. MAURETTE
A. D. MAYNES
R. E. MCCROSKY
B. A. MCINTOSH
I. D. R. MCKINNON
H. Y. MCSWEEN
H. J. MELOSH IV
P. E. MILLMAN
D. J. MILTON
D. MITTLEFEHLDT
O. E. MONNIG
C. B. MOORE
H. NAGAHARA
J. A. NELEN
W. A. NICHIPORUK
A. O. C. NIER
H. H. NININGER
K. NISHIIZUMI
H. NISHIMURA
L .E. NYQUIST
J. A. O'KEEFE
E. OLSEN
U. OTT
V. OVERSBY
M. OZIMA
H. PALME
D. A. PAPANASTASSIOU
P. W. PELLAS
R. O. PEPIN
J. A. PHILPOTTS
C. T. PILLINGER
F. A PODOSEK
B. POWELL
M. PRINZ
R. S. RAJAN
E. R. RAMBALDI
P. W. RAMDOHR
K. RANKAMA
W. F. READ
G. W. REED JR
R. C. REEDY
A. M. REID
J. REYNOLDS
R. T. REYNOLDS
A. E. RINGWOOD
T. E. RODMAN
M. W. ROWE
G. L. ROWLAND
A. E. RUBIN
J. A. RUSSELL
D. R SCHMIDT
R. SCHMITT
D. N. SCHRAMM
L. SCHULTZ
G. SCHWARZ
E. R. D. SCOTT
D. W. SEARS
D. SHAW
E. M. SHOEMAKER
P. SIGNER
L. SILVER
J. V. SMITH
K. G. SNETSINGER
I. M. STEELE
D. STOFFLER
E. M. STOLPER
H. E. SUESS
H. TAKEDA
J. TANNER
M TATSUMOTO
G. J. TAYLOR
S. R. TAYLOR
L. A. TAYLOR
M. H. THIEMENS
K. TOMEOKA
K. K. TUREKIAN
G. TURNER
H. E. UHLIG
W. R. VAN SCHMUS
H. E. VOSHAGE
R. M. WALKER
L. S. WALTER
H. WÄNKE
D. WARK
P. H. WARREN
G. J. WASSERBURG
J. T. WASSON
R. A. WEBB
G. W. WETHERILL
F. L. WHIPPLE
F. E. WICKMAN
R. WIELER
H .B. WIIK
L. L. WILKENING
F. WLOTZKA
J. A. WOOD
F. W. WRIGHT
K. YANAI
E. ZINNER
M. E. ZOLENSKY